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Correspondence on “The views of people with a lived experience of deafness and the general public regarding genetic testing for deafness in the reproductive setting: A systematic review” by Freeman et al

  • Jie Li
    Affiliations
    Medical Genetics Center, Lanzhou Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Gansu, China
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  • Xiaohong Sun
    Correspondence
    Correspondence and requests for materials should be addressed to Xiaohong Sun, Medical Genetics Center, Lanzhou Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Lanzhou 730000, Gansu, China.
    Affiliations
    Medical Genetics Center, Lanzhou Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Gansu, China
    Search for articles by this author
Published:November 14, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gim.2022.08.032
      Hearing loss is a common sensory disorder that can be caused by environmental factors, genetic defects, or a combination of both.
      • Boudreault P.
      • Baldwin E.E.
      • Fox M.
      • et al.
      Deaf adults’ reasons for genetic testing depend on cultural affiliation: results from a prospective, longitudinal genetic counseling and testing study.
      About 60% of severe congenital hearing loss is thought to be caused by genetic factors, with alterations in the GJB2 gene being the most common reason for nonsyndromic deafness cases in children.
      • Fu X.
      • Cai Y.
      • Hu Y.
      • Liu J.
      • Yang T.
      Attitudes toward carrier screening and prenatal diagnosis for recessive hereditary deafness among the educated population in urban China.
      In recent years, advances in the medical understanding of molecular genetic basis of deafness have made genetic testing an option for individuals with deafness and their families.
      • Thomas L.A.
      • Lewis S.
      • Massie J.
      • et al.
      Which types of conditions should be included in reproductive genetic carrier screening? Views of parents of children with a genetic condition.
      Therefore, diagnostic testing, carrier screening, and prenatal genetic testing for deafness-causing genes is likely to become part of routine clinical practice. The acceptance of such testing will depend on the understanding and opinion of the population involved with the testing.
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      References

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      Linked Article

      • Response to Li and Sun
        Genetics in Medicine
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          We thank Li and Sun for their interest in our paper1 and their comments. We agree with the authors that views regarding genetic testing for deafness in the reproductive setting may be influenced by the access to accurate risk information and genetic counseling and that both of these together with access to testing itself may differ in cost depending on the health care system.
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